03 March 2018

Getting ready to leave Guiyang

Easy day at home, mostly packing and enjoying a late lunch with family. Today we ate fish, but only later I realized two of the black fish that were cooked with spring onion, garlic and chili were from the pond we have in our terrace. I like the idea: you can have pet fish in a tank, but at some point you eat them. The cycle of life continues.

For dinner we were invited by a friend and his family to a Miao theme restaurant, there are many around Hunan now but this is new in Guiyang. Guiyang seems to be developing fast, and what may have been considered too exotic to make money a few years ago now all of a sudden is popular with the rising middle class.

The Miao people are one of the best known minorities in China and live in scattered groups in many provinces, but mostly in about ten. Hunan has the second largest group, some 1.7 million people, or close to 3% of the population of the province. Only the adjacent Guizhou province has more. We had seen many in Western Hunan two years ago, this is the first time here in Guiyang. I am pleased to see that the wealth of minorities once again seems to be recognized as an asset in the country.

Food is served in the usual "lazy Susan" turning table and is quite varied, rich and, of course, spicy! People, eat, drink, laugh and even smoke cigarettes, all at once. Most of the men drink a lot. Chinese rice liquor. They drink one shot at the time, and to prove their point every time turn the empty glass to the other so everyone can see inside that it is empty. Sometimes they turn it upside down to show that not a drop is left. I drink two or three, then stop. I am not into this kind of competition, which I could never win anyway. Amazingly, no one gets drunk and at the end of the evening they will all walk home (or even drive home) without any issue. I thought the Russians and the Ukrainians were the toughest drinkers, or perhaps the Poles, but the Hunanese could take on any East European!

Four ladies in Miao costumes tour the restaurant and visit each and every one of the reserved tables and pour sweetish and mildly alcoholic drink into a carafe and from there to a cup positioned on lips of the "guest of honor", who must drink it all up! At our table, of course, that is me! I actually like the drink, though it is not so easy to swallow all that is required to look good, but in the end I manage to do so and avoid embarrassment!

Meanwhile the kids of the families attending play around the restaurant. The are full of energy and do not seem to care that it is getting late.

On our way back home, at the end of the meal, the children jumped on a street stage that has been prepare for a jazz festival that starts tomorrow. Too bad we'll miss the festival as we have to leave, but it's fun to see the kids dance tonight! And it's good to see jazz taking root in China, it's not been a favorite in the country for now, although increasingly available in the big cities. I guess, but I am not sure, that one advantage for jazz is that it is usually not as politically controversial as other genres and therefore not likely to be subject to any kind of censorship or restrictions. (Icelandic singer Björk got herself banned when she mentioned Tibet in one of her appearances.)

While we keep an eye on them, a friend bought us a cold drink, a kind of milk shake with beads made of paste of some beans. Quite new for me but refreshing and tasty, great to finish off the night!

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